LenardMarcus

Principal

Office Location:
McLean, VA
Email:
lmarcus@edisonventures.com
Phone:
609-873-9233
“My job: finding the missing piece of the puzzle—capital, talent, creative ideas—that helps a company take off.”

I am grateful and get fired up for the opportunity to interact and work with the most passionate minds in business. As a venture capitalist we are in a unique position to see constant success and failure, but most importantly, how to apply these lessons learned in partnerships with our portfolio executives and colleagues. I am an intense competitor at heart but realize it’s all about the people as it takes a village to help build and be part of something great.

Lenard is responsible for leading Edison investments in companies primarily located in the mid-Atlantic area. Lenard co-leads Health Care IT investments  and leads Edison’s Security practice. Lenard is active in the mid-Atlantic venture community serving as a board member for the Virginia’s Center for Innovation and Technology, which focuses on investing in early stage companies in the Virginia Commonwealth. He is also a member of the Mid-Atlantic Venture Association (MAVA), Deloitte & Touche Technology, the Greater Baltimore Technology Council, and the Northern Virginia Technology Council.

Prior Experience

Lenard began his career at IBM where he worked as a Financial Analyst for IBM Global Services. His main responsibilities were overseeing a budget of $80 million and partnering with international locations to decrease the project costs of IBM Global Services West. Later, Lenard worked for Princeton eCom—an online bill payment company—where, as Manager of B2C Implementations; he oversaw one of the largest joint ventures in the company’s history. Lenard also worked in healthcare investment banking for Wachovia Securities.

Other Investment Experience

Regent 

Education

BS, Industrial Engineering, Stanford University

MBA, Columbia Business School, concentration in Finance and Management

My greatest business lesson happened when I was three years out of undergrad working at a consulting firm.

My company was bidding on a project to help a financial organization create a specialized marketing plan to better target the Hispanic market. I was a junior member of the organization but when my managing partner had to cancel I ran the meeting. When I entered the room, the client picked-up the phone and asked why is someone so junior in his office. I quickly informed him that his competitors were already serving the market more readily because they had hired sales reps of Hispanic decent. I informed him that industry research revealed that “likes buy from likes” typically based on ethnicity. I then told him that his century old firm had one sales rep who was proficient in Spanish. I then advised him to sit down and hang up the phone. He did and my firm won the contract.

The lesson is to be prepared for every meeting beyond a cursory discussion. It will enable you to quickly gain trust that will eclipse any perceived limitations.